The Angels’ Share (2012)

What I like about Ken Loach as a filmmaker is his willingness to engage with groups of society traditionally occluded by narrative fiction, specifically those underprivileged people traditionally referred to as ‘working class’. And it’s not just this, but the way he generally refrains from judgement or talking down, and makes them the full protagonists of their own stories, over which they have control. It’s a rare enough thing in mainstream cinema, and Loach goes even further here by allowing his motley group of Scottish friends (most of whom haven’t been given many opportunities in life and who live in an atmosphere of constant violence) to take on vested interests and succeed on their own terms. It’s working-class wish fulfilment, and there’s absolutely nothing wrong with that — although it’s really very silly. The thing is, at times it feels like an extended commercial for the Scottish tourist board, and while they might have been wary of taking as our heroes a bunch of somewhat airbrushed Trainspotting rejects (in and out of prison, and trying to go straight), the sweeping Highlands scenery, a bit of the Proclaimers’ music, and the prominence played in the plot by the whisky industry comes straight out of the promotional playbook. We even have to accept that our lead character Robbie (Paul Brannigan), on the apparent basis of only a few drams shared with him by his English boss Harry (John Henshaw) as well as some small sample bottles nicked from a distillery tour, can then distinguish between a Cragganmore and a Glenfarclas. Perhaps it’s just condescending of me to suggest that it would be difficult to tell these two apart so quickly; maybe it’s obvious to anyone who’s had a taste of any whisky. But I’m a sucker for a happy ending, and this film, while cleaving to a lot of the signifiers of the kitchen sink drama, turns out very sweetly in the end.

The Angels' Share film posterCREDITS
Director Ken Loach; Writer Paul Laverty; Cinematographer Robbie Ryan; Starring Paul Brannigan, John Henshaw; Length 106 minutes.
Seen at friend’s home (DVD), London, Tuesday 10 June 2014.

One thought on “The Angels’ Share (2012)

  1. I liked this, but found some of it frustrating. I thought the more interesting scenes related to Robbie and co in Glasgow, particularly the way Loach highlights Scotland’s justice system and the way convicted criminals have to face their victims. That was pretty powerful. The caper in the distillery I wasn’t so fussed about, it felt a bit uneven to me. But overall, as I say, I did like it…and the happy ending.

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