The Good Lie (2014)

I’ve been feeling uncomfortable about star ratings for some time now, so I thought I’d try out something a bit simpler, because the nuance should be in the text, not the rating. (Though I’ve retained the stars, in the categories, for old times’ sake.)


You just have to look at the poster to get the sense that this will be (yet another) feel-good story of poor African people redeemed by magical white Western saviours, but — and I think most reviewers have pointed this out — that would be largely inaccurate. Even when Reese Witherspoon’s employment agency counsellor does appear, once our refugee heroes have made it to the United States, it’s made clear that she’s largely clueless about the refugees’ situation and constrained by many other factors from being of more help to them (though she does what she can). No, this ends up being a story primarily of three Sudanese men and one woman, in two acts: first, as they struggle as children to flee bloody warfare in the late-1980s, eventually reaching a Kenyan refugee camp; and then over a decade later when they are relocated to the United States (a programme which largely ceased in September 2001). It makes plain the struggles that they and their compatriots faced in this period — one which was never exactly top of the Western news agenda (where one African conflict somewhat shaded into all the others) — and imbues a great sense of empathy and humanity to these four embattled young people. Once the film moves Stateside (where we stay with the three guys in Kansas City, Missouri, while their sister is sent away to Boston), there’s a bit of fish-out-of-water comedy, and though one senses that the struggle narrative of the first half could easily be picked up and folded into tensions around immigrants and race, the film thankfully opts instead to embrace a hope for positive change. So The Good Lie may not be perfect, but it’s also warm-hearted and generous to its protagonists, and ultimately a fascinating story well told.


© Warner Bros. Pictures

NEW RELEASE FILM REVIEW
Director Philippe Falardeau | Writer Margaret Nagle | Cinematographer Ronald Plante | Starring Arnold Oceng, Ger Duany, Emmanuel Jal, Reese Witherspoon | Length 110 minutes || Seen at Olympic Studios, London, Sunday 10 May 2015

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2 thoughts on “The Good Lie (2014)

  1. This is very good news – the trailer looked kind of terrible, particularly when they said it was brought to you by (??? presumably the studio) who made The Blind Side.

    1. Definitely worth watching in my opinion. It’s good old-fashioned filmmaking with humanity, and a generosity of spirit towards all its characters (and a relative minimum of sentimentality).

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