LFF: Flocken (Flocking, 2015)

BFI London Film Festival This film was presented at the London Film Festival. There was no introduction, so I presume there was also no Q&A afterwards.


I think it’s reasonable to say that many films in recent years have been concerned with the impact of technology and changing patterns of communication on societies, particularly young people (it was a central theme of the first film I saw at the Film Festival as well, Mountains May Depart). So it is with this story, based loosely on real events I understand — and sadly, all too believable — about a young woman, Jennifer (Fatime Azemi), who speaks out about her experience of rape by fellow classmate Alexander (John Risto). She is quickly shunned by her classmates and her family ostracised by their small rural community, as nobody is willing to believe the truth of what she says, while her attacker, without his saying very much at all (either affirming or against the allegations), finds himself protected by his family and all the town’s institutions. There’s a strong suggestion that the allegations have divided the town along class lines — Jennifer and her family seem to be viewed as somehow lesser than golden boy Alexander — but it’s all presented very understatedly. Indeed, the film’s style is beautifully controlled, the tension in the script cued up right away with a brief scene of Jennifer and two of her classmates doing little more than carrying a cake at a wedding, while the images have a glacially toned palette and there’s plenty of artfully shallow focus. There’s relatively little overt nastiness on display amongst the characters — the most unpleasant exchanges are presented as captioned text conversations that unfurl over subtly disturbing static shots — and while it’s fair to say it’s hardly cheery, it also feels less emotionally exploitative than your typical Haneke film. There’s a lot to unpack going on here, but Flocking is a useful and timely reminder of the toxic effects of modern rape culture as expressed via anonymised social media.


FILM FESTIVAL FILM REVIEW: London Film Festival
Director Beata Gårdeler | Writer Emma Broström | Cinematographer Gösta Reiland | Starring Fatime Azemi, John Risto | Length 110 minutes || Seen at BFI Southbank, London, Monday 12 October 2015

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