Criterion Sunday 52: Yojinbo (Yojimbo, 1961)

The thing that’s surprising, re-watching this samurai film by Akira Kurosawa, is just how grimly violent it is. There are severed arms, spurting blood, and all kinds of injury details that seem almost shocking in the context of a black-and-white 1960s film, least of all one with the time-hallowed prestige of Yojimbo. In fact, the way the film gleefully works against that ingrained prestige — such qualities as come from being a period-set film with established stars and director, and its subsequent induction into the hallowed Criterion Collection, not to mention plenty of best-of/best-ever lists — is what makes it most interesting, and for me a more essential Kurosawa than his more-feted Seven Samurai (1954). It’s clear from its story of Toshiro Mifune as an unnamed and directionless ronin that plenty of later directors were watching carefully and cribbing notes, too, whether acknowledged influences like Sergio Leone’s ‘Man with No Name’ films, or rather more subtle ones — the Han Solo character in Star Wars (and thus much of Harrison Ford’s subsequent career) seems lifted from Mifune here, who has a laidback charm even as people scurry anxiously and murderously around him. His travels bring him to the small, bitterly-divided village where the film is set, where he keeps his identity guarded (calling himself only Sanjuro, for a field of mulberry he spots when asked the question), and largely hangs out at a local inn while surveying the shuttered buildings around him and their wary occupants. Watching Mifune play the various factions against one another to his advantage is delightful — he promises his services as a bodyguard (yojimbo) for ever-increasing fees to whomever is most desperate — and when he’s not impressing them with his bravura skills, he’s sitting back and watching each side unravel. It’s all shot in crisp black-and-white with lots of deep focus shots and musical accompaniment worthy of the Western genre Kurosawa so loved. It’s one of Kurosawa’s very best, and was popular enough that it would lead to a sequel the following year, Sanjuro.


FILM REVIEW: Criterion Collection
Director Akira Kurosawa | Writers Ryuzo Kikushima and Akira Kurosawa | Cinematographers Kazuo Miyagawa and Takao Saito | Starring Toshiro Mifune, Tatsuya Nakadai | Length 110 minutes || Seen at Paramount, Wellington, Wednesday 7 April 1999 (earlier on VHS at home in Wellington, June 1998, and most recently on Blu-ray at home in London, Sunday 1 November 2015)

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2 thoughts on “Criterion Sunday 52: Yojinbo (Yojimbo, 1961)

  1. I hadn’t made the connection to Han Solo, that’s a pretty good point. By co-incidence, I’ve always wondered how much of Sanjuro (which I prefer) Liam Neeson watched before playing Qui-Gon Jinn in the Phantom Menace – there isn’t much in that film that I like, but I’m fond of Jinn: quiet, slow to anger, grim when the impetuousness of others causes him to draw his blade.

    1. I think it’s a matter of record that George Lucas had a major hard-on (technical film crit term there) for the films of Akira Kurosawa, and watching them you can see very clearly what he’s ripped off stylistically (those damn wipe cuts for a start). I wouldn’t be surprised if it extended to the characters too, but basically Lucas has clearly seen them all a great deal. And yeah, I’m coming round to Sanjuro too.

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