Criterion Sunday 63: Carnival of Souls (1962)

This early-1960s oddity was a one-off feature from its creators, but it somehow stands out from other low-budget quickly-shot exploitation-themed films of the era by virtue of the polish and expertise it shows both in the filming and the acting. Largely this is because its makers had a lifetime of experience in industrial filmmaking, turning their hand early in their careers to something a bit more genre in a long-shot hope of wider success, though that took several decades to arrive. It follows a young woman, Mary (Candace Hilligoss), involved in a near-fatal car accident in Lawrence, Kansas near the beginning from which she is the only survivor. Feeling traumatised, she goes on the road, ending up in Salt Lake City, Utah, where she takes a room. Increasingly she finds herself haunted by a demonic presence (in fact, her director in white greasepaint make-up). Fairly simple elements, really, but they’re made effective by the quality of the photography and the eerieness of the atmosphere, which is created partly by the organ score (Mary plays a professional organist), as well as by the distinctive quality of Hilligoss’s performance. She is called on to drift affectlessly through the film, as if in some kind of limbo between life and death, a liminal state only further emphasised by Hervey’s ghoulish appearances as well as periodic slips into a sort of non-existence during which people don’t seem to be aware of Mary’s presence. It suggests something of a protean The Sixth Sense, and though playing with a lot of familiar horror film tropes, it’s definitely a fascinating outlier in film history.

Criterion Extras: Quite a packed collection for extras is this one, which aside from having both cuts of the film (the original 75 minute release, and the extended director’s cut), also has some featurette extras. The lengthiest is The Movie That Wouldn’t Die!, a local Kansas TV piece from 1989 about the film’s re-release (its first official release on VHS) and rise to cult fame, which catches up with the director, writer and some of the cast as they recall its making so many years before, along with clips of the (re)-premiere that year. The same TV presenter returns for The Carnival Tour, a shorter segment revisiting the film’s locations around Lawrence, Kansas as well as the spectacular pavilion near Salt Lake City, Utah (Saltair) that was the film’s inspiration. Both pieces, despite their low-budget lo-fi 80s TV origins, are nicely put together and have a local’s enthusiasm to them that is of a piece with the film.

There are in addition a number of illustrated (text-based) essays, one about the history of the Saltair resort, and interviews by each of Harvey, writer Clifford and star Hilligoss, interspersed with plenty of images of them making the film as well as movie ephemera and promotional materials.


FILM REVIEW: Criterion Collection
Director Herk Harvey | Writers Herk Harvey and John Clifford | Cinematographer Maurice Prather | Starring Candace Hilligoss | Length 84 minutes || Seen at a friend’s home (DVD), London, Sunday 22 November 2015 (and again at home, London, Tuesday 9 February 2016)

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