July 2018 Film Roundup

A bit late with it this month, but after my lacklustre effort in June to watch new films (I only managed three in total), I’ve redoubled my efforts and can for July present you an EXPANDED new films list, that even so manages to miss out the wonderfully enjoyable Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again… It’s been a month of SUN and HEATWAVE temperatures (for Britain) which means that the cool comfort of a cinema screen has been particularly welcome. (As ever, daily write-ups are at Letterboxd.)

Last month I also promised an update for stats fans, and I can confirm that 50% of the features I watched in July were directed by women (20 out of 40 films in total), and as you can see six of them show up in each of the top 10s below. Moreover, 53% of the films I saw (i.e. 21) were directed by people of colour.

Top 10 New Films (on their first release in the UK)


Leave No Trace (2018, dir. Debra Granik)
Cold War (2018, dir. Pawel Pawlikowski)
Shakedown (2018, dir. Leilah Weinraub)
In the Fade (2017, dir. Fatih Akin)
Naila and the Uprising (2017, dir. Julia Bacha)
Outside In (2017, dir. Lynn Shelton)
Speak Up (2017, dir. Amandine Gay)
Mission: Impossible – Fallout (2018, dir. Christopher McQuarrie)
Claire’s Camera (2017, dir. Hong Sang-soo)
Pin Cushion (2017, dir. Deborah Haywood)

I saw all but one of these films at a cinema (the odd one out was Netflix-only release Outside In). For some of them, saying they were on “release” is a little misleading (Claire’s Camera was a one-off Korean Film Festival preview screening, Speak Up was another one-off screening, while Cold War is being released properly at the end of August).

It’s good to see more 2018 films finally making these lists, and the two up the top are surely the strongest of 2018’s dramatic narrative films I’ve seen so far this year. Leave No Trace for me is superior to the same director’s Winter’s Bone of almost ten years ago, and the young woman at the centre of the story is a New Zealand actor it turns out. In any case, she gives a great performance, coming across (and I mean this as a compliment) as an unrehearsed non-actor, someone who’s really living the part. Ben Foster also disappears into the film, as he tends to do (he’s been in so many good films, but I still don’t really know how to spot him). Cold War, meanwhile, in a sense extends Pawlikowski’s black-and-white historical Polish stories after Ida, but strikes a quite different tone. There’s a heavy sense of doomed romance, and Pawlikowski cuts out everything that’s extraneous, so that it comes in at under 90 minutes.

Elsewhere, there’s a strong showing from documentaries, which this past month have ranged across subjects like underground LA queer sex workers in Shakedown (a fascinating story of people who aren’t much represented on screen) to reminiscences of the Palestinian Intifada in Naila and the Uprising, and French feminists of colour speaking direct to camera in Speak Up.

Outside In and Pin Cushion are little indie dramas from the US and UK respectively, the latter of which has a bleak edge that makes what initially seems like a twee coming of age story feel a little more raw by its conclusion. Mission: Impossible – Fallout is the blockbuster on the list (which feels a little rote now in this franchise, but still manages to pack plenty in), and In the Fade is a fine German film anchored by an amazing performance from Diane Kruger. Finally, if you haven’t really enjoyed some of Hong Sang-soo’s recent films, you probably won’t like Claire’s Camera because it continues his improvisational non-style-as-style technique, and has a daffy Isabelle Huppert wandering around Cannes.

Top 10 Old Films (but new to me)

beDevil (1993, dir. Tracey Moffatt)
I Am Somebody (1970, dir. Madeline Anderson)
Chocolat (1988, dir. Claire Denis)
The Battle of Chile (1975-79, dir. Patricio Guzman)
Mamma Mia! (2008, dir. Phyllida Lloyd)
Mossane (1996, dir. Safi Faye)
Little Fugitive (1953, dir. Morris Engel/Ruth Sorkin/Ray Ashley)
Thursday Till Sunday (2012, dir. Dominga Sotomayor)
The Man by the Shore (1993, dir. Raoul Peck)
The Nights of Zayandeh-Rood (1990, dir. Mohsen Makhmalbaf)

After last month’s blow-out at Bologna, most of these were seen at home, although it’s notable that the top two were seen at Bristol’s Cinema Rediscovered festival, which takes direct inspiration from Bologna. It’s a new festival, but Bristol is a lovely city with plenty of sense of artistic discovery and I look forward to revisiting it. Tracey Moffatt is an Australian artist of part Aboriginal descent, and beDevil was her only feature: it is very much the film of an artist, and has a singular sense of place, with the kind of stage-bound feeling of old Hollywood movies but riven through with a confrontational sensibility that makes it very much an outlier of everything else being made at the time. I Am Somebody, meanwhile, is a short film made during the Civil Rights movement which deals with intersectional ideas of the struggle for social change at a time when these ideas were still in their infancy.

The others largely just reflect what I’ve been renting from my video shop, although the Raoul Peck film is from me struggling to work through a box set of his Haitian films, and Mossane was a one-off screening at the BFI of a singular Black African woman filmmaker (one of very few).

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