August 2018 Film Roundup

I was on holiday at the start of the month, so I entirely neglected this at the time, hence the lateness. My July round-up was a bumper bonus crop, so I’m back to the usual five new and 10 old films this month, though you can rest assured I saw more of both, a total of 44 films including rewatches. (As ever, daily write-ups are at Letterboxd.)

Top 5 New Films (on their first release in the UK)


Madeline’s Madeline (2018, dir. Josephine Decker)
Sorry to Bother You (2018, dir. Boots Riley)
Las herederas (The Heiresses, 2018, dir. Marcelo Martinessi)
To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before (2018, dir. Susan Johnson)
Las Sandinistas (2018, dir. Jenny Murray)

First up, the most important point to make is that the first two films haven’t even been released in the UK (though they’re new films obviously, hence their inclusion). Madeline’s Madeline is about an experimental theatre troupe and deals with issues of performance, and socialisation in groups, and is being shown at the London Film Festival in October. I adored the same director’s previous films Butter on the Latch (2013) and Thou Wast Mild and Lovely (2014) — the latter, in particular, has imagery that still sticks in my mind, so I feel I should really revisit it.

The second film is a raucous satire about black people in modern America, and I can only presume distributors don’t think it will appeal to British audiences (which is just ridiculous). It fizzes with energy, even if it can seem a little madcap at times — though there’s no amount of comic stretching that could really compare to the reality of the situation — so I’m inclined to allow the film its wilder imagery. The performances are stellar too, not least Lakeith Stanfield in the central role, and Tessa Thompson as his nihilist artist girlfriend Detroit. I hope it gets a UK release before the year is out.

The other three are a mix of films in the cinema — The Heiresses a slow-burn Paraguayan drama about two an elderly lesbian couple, one of whom suddenly finds herself needing to express her independence, and Las Sandinistas a documentary about that Nicaraguan movement, especially during the 80s and 90s, which takes the form of an almost rock-and-roll assemblage and moves along nimbly.

Finally, there’s a rare triumph of a Netflix film (To All the Boys…) which may not be the most cinematically advanced film, and may rely on at least some hoary old genres, but manages to feel fresh and also, crucially, just utterly delightful and charming.

Top 10 Old Films (but new to me)


Pickup on South Street (1953, dir. Samuel Fuller)
Se, Jie (Lust, Caution, 2007, dir. Ang Lee)
Le Bonheur (1965, dir. Agnes Varda)
Public Housing (1997, dir. Frederick Wiseman)
Bei Xi Mo Shou (Behemoth, 2015, dir. Zhao Liang)
La Pointe-Courte (1955, dir. Agnes Varda)
Werewolf (2016, dir. Ashley Mackenzie)
Fruitvale Station (2013, dir. Ryan Coogler)
Blue Black Permanent (1992, dir. Margaret Tait)
Malgré la nuit (Despite the Night, 2015, dir. Philippe Grandrieux)

The Mubi streaming service again provides a number of these — an Ang Lee season allowed me to catch up with his Lust, Caution, which turns out to be an effective and lush film about espionage and relationships wartime China, while a season of new Canadian films yielded Werewolf, my favourite of the bunch I’ve seen, which despite the title deals with methadone addicts in small-town Canada, and has a striking style (also, it may technically count as a ‘new film’ I guess, given I daresay it hasn’t had any kind of screening before now in the UK). Finally, Blue Black Permanent was something they put up in collaboration with the wonderful Cinema Rediscovered festival at Bristol’s Watershed, and is a fine film made by a poet, and which has that sensibility to its imagery.

A couple of others come from a touring Agnès Varda season that’s been doing the rounds ahead of her upcoming Faces Places film (released in the UK on 21 September, finally). I’d seen neither Le Bonheur (a spiky relationship drama) nor her debut La Pointe-Courte (about a small fishing village), but both are excellent, though dare I say it perhaps Varda is getting a little overexposed now…

The top place goes to a film I saw as part of my regular Criterion watching, a film by Samuel Fuller that’s equal to his muckracking tabloid-style movies of the 60s, and has noirish style to spare, in its story of wartime espionage, Communist spies, and a wonderful Thelma Ritter as an embittered lady who’s not taking it anymore.

The rest are all films I rented over the month, a range of documentaries (Behemoth about strip-mining in China, and Public Housing about, er, well you can guess… in Chicago), a film torn from the headlines (Ryan Coogler’s fine debut Fruitvale Station, about a shooting on the San Francisco BART system), and Philippe Grandrieux’s bold expressive film about his usual dark subject matter: relationships gone bad.

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