September 2018 Film Roundup

My August round-up was late, so here I am back (more or less) on time with September. The start of the month I was in LA with family, but since then I’ve been back to the cinema. In fact, 63% of the films I saw last month were at the cinema, though I only scraped by with one film per day on average in any location including home (which is the lowest of the year so far and will certainly be surpassed in October, which is London Film Festival month). In fact, generally it was a poor month for women directors and directors of colour so I’ll be looking to redress that with my film festival picks. (As ever, daily write-ups are at Letterboxd.)

Top 5 New Films (on their first release in the UK)


Skate Kitchen (2018, dir. Crystal Moselle)
The Miseducation of Cameron Post (2018, dir. Desiree Akhavan)
A Simple Favor (aka A Simple Favour, 2018, dir. Paul Feig)
Lucky (2017, dir. John Carroll Lynch)
Visages villages (Faces Places, 2017, dir. Agnès Varda/JR)

All of these films were seen in the cinema, for a change, including the very belated UK release of Agnès Varda’s documentary (which premiered at Cannes last year). Lucky was also a slow road to UK cinemas — its star Harry Dean Stanton sadly passed away in the meantime — but it has that kind of Straight Story/Jarmusch vibe, so it holds up. The others are far more current and vibrant, and I was in particular surprised by A Simple Favor which was silly and genre-bending, but had comedy, thrills and some excellent acting from Blake Lively and Anna Kendrick.

As for the top two, I’ve definitely seen some far less sympathetic write-ups — and I do agree that Skate Kitchen‘s actual story is a little bit rote — but in both cases I love the style, that sort of quiet reflective almost accidental way of coming across a narrative. The first is also infused with documentary influences, which work really well.

Top 10 Old Films (but new to me)


The Spook Who Sat by the Door (1973, dir. Ivan Dixon)
Samson and Delilah (2009, dir. Warwick Thornton)
Berlin: Die Sinfonie der Großstadt (Berlin: A Symphony of a Great City, 1927, dir. Walther Ruttmann)
Onibaba (1964, dir. Kaneto Shindo)
Ukigusa Monogatari (A Story of Floating Weeds, 1934, dir. Yasujiro Ozu)
Chameleon Street (1989, dir. Wendell B. Harris Jr)
Salvatore Giuliano (1962, dir. Francesco Rosi)
Le Corbeau (1943, dir. Henri-Georges Clouzot)
Listen to Britain (1942, dir. Humphrey Jennings/Stewart McAllister)
People Power Bombshell: The Diary of Vietnam Rose (2016, dir. John Torres)

I saw three of these in the cinema, two of them in a “Black and Banned” retrospective at the BFI of under-seen filmmaking by Black filmmakers — though neither The Spook Who Sat by the Door (a wild satire which reminded me of last month’s Sorry to Bother You) nor Chameleon Street (another satire, and a Sundance favourite) were banned per se, they did de facto slip into that category by being shunned by distributors and then locked away in purgatory, meaning they never got proper distribution. The other film I saw in the cinema was a Filipino film about film history and representation, People Power Bombshell, a very thoughtful and multilayered film which probably should be in the top list (can’t imagine it’s had any other kind of release).

Mubi stepped up for Berlin and Listen to Britain, but otherwise I’ve mainly been watching short films there (the latter is a short), and somewhat more complex (and clearly unsatisfying) films this month. A very strong four films come from the regular Criterion Collection watching, so expect reviews of them in upcoming months. Finally, there’s Samson and Delilah, which I rented on DVD because I really liked the director’s recent Sweet Country, and it is indeed an excellent (if expectedly depressing) story about Aboriginal Australians.

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