November 2018 Film Roundup

Another month (a week or so into it anyway)! And I’ve been watching plenty since October’s rundown, trying to catch up on some classics, though disappointingly too many of the films I saw this month were directed by men. Still there’s some interesting stuff I think. (As ever, daily write-ups are at Letterboxd.)

Top 5 New Films (on their first release in the UK)


Widows (2018, dir. Steve McQueen)
Time for Ilhan (2018, dir. Norah Shapiro)
Roma (2018, dir. Alfonso Cuarón)
Black Mother (2018, dir. Khalik Allah)
Charm City (2018, dir. Marilyn Ness)

I saw all of these films in the cinema! That much is unusual because there’s reliably always a few that only pop up on Netflix or Mubi these days. I even went to see my top-rated film twice, mainly because the first time I didn’t feel I saw it in the best way, plus I was a bit sideswiped by its tone. It’s billed as a generic heist movie, but it lacks a lot of those genre elements, and it’s a far quieter, far more emotionally fragile film about people (women) who have been knocked back in life and are struggling to rebuild, which is where the heist comes in. Anyway, Viola Davis, Michelle Rodriguez and Elizabeth Debicki are all on top form, plus there’s some really brilliant from Daniel Kaluuya and Brian Tyree Henry too.

Three others are documentaries, all of which I really liked, two of which present more challenging urban US environments and try to find the positives within them (whether through the political candidacy of a charismatic Muslim-American woman in Time for Ilhan, or the engaged presence of community organisers working to curb violence in Baltimore in Charm City). The other documentary, Black Mother is by a filmmaker who’s cropped up a bunch of times on my round-ups this year, whose work I’m really enjoying, although this film by Khalik Allah is somehow both more beautiful and more troubling at times in its evocation of his idea of womanhood.

Finally, there’s room for Roma, which most people will be seeing on Netflix because it was made by them, but which I saw a rare cinematic screening of, and it is quite lovely in its busy set design details and sometimes frenetic action, but all covered by a glacially moving camera that sweeps and glides across everything with equanimity.

Top 10 Old Films (but new to me)


Pyaasa (1957, dir. Guru Dutt)
The Passionate Friends (1949, dir. David Lean)
好男好女 Hao Nan Hao Nu (Good Men, Good Women, 1995, dir. Hou Hsiao-hsien)
Moloch Tropical (2009, dir. Raoul Peck)
Winchester ’73 (1950, dir. Anthony Mann)
俺は園子温だ! Ore wa Sono Sion da! (I Am Sono Sion!, 1985, dir. Sion Sono)
Last Holiday (2006, dir. Wayne Wang)
Cinnamon (2006, dir. Kevin Jerome Everson)
Wakefield Express (1952, dir. Lindsay Anderson)
3 Women (1977, dir. Robert Altman)

Like last month’s list, the ones down the bottom of this month again were a little disappointing (I don’t think this is Altman’s finest film by any means, but it has its moments). However, the Guru Dutt was a revelation and I look forward to watching some more of his output, which gained a feature on Mubi online streaming this month.

The Everson film was part of a series of his work on Mubi (I’ve put a few others on the last few months’ lists), as was the Anthony Mann western, while the Wayne Wang holiday film was on Netflix — largely forgettable, but also largely likeable thanks to Queen Latifah in the lead role, but most of the rest were on DVD. The Hou film I’d been meaning to catch up with for a long time (given it had its moment just before I started getting into cinema in the late-90s). The Passionate Friends is David Lean following up Brief Encounter in the same vein, and largely succeeding — I watched it on the recommendation of the Pure Cinema podcast, a couple of intense and literate film nerds who cover a decent range of releases, who were strangely enthusiastic about this film (I think it had had a Paul Thomas Anderson nod at some point). I do also want to note the Raoul Peck film, on a French boxset of his work, and a surprisingly powerful (and beautiful) evocation of a dictator losing touch with his people.

The only one I saw on a big screen was Sion Sono’s debut medium-length film, which is punky and vibrant and quite exciting as an experiment in form, part of the London East Asian Film Festival.

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