Hester Street (1975)

It’s been a while since I posted non-Criterion reviews over on my blog, but I’m always writing little capsules about every film I see elsewhere, so I thought I’d try adding them here too! Let’s see if I can keep this up better than some other features I’ve tried to add.


Set in late-19th century New York City, this period film focuses on Steven Keats’s character Yankle, who arrives in America from a Russian shtetl and soon shaves his beard to assume a new ‘Yankee’ appearance as Jake, despite still being very much immersed in and surrounded by Jewish life. When his wife Gitl (played by a young Carol Kane) arrives behind him with their son, the story starts to shift its focus towards her inability to assimilate, and the tensions this causes in the marriage. As such, it’s a story about immigrants in a new culture, and the ways they adjust. There’s a slightly stagy quality to the film in terms of the way it’s filmed (it reminds of some contemporary British television plays), but I suspect this may be more of an attempt to formally locate the film in its period setting: it has an archaic quality not just from its setting and from the costumes and the use of Yiddish, but also the formal strategies themselves. It’s not a silent movie though (aside from the credits sequence), but it pretty succesfully feels like a film preserved from another era entirely.

CREDITS
Director/Writer Joan Micklin Silver (based on the novella Yekl: A Tale of the New York Ghetto by Abraham Cahan); Cinematographer Kenneth Van Sickle; Starring Steven Keats, Carol Kane; Length 90 minutes.
Seen at home (DVD), London, Tuesday 9 July 2019.

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