Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2 (2011)


FILM REVIEW || Director David Yates | Writer Steve Kloves (based on the novel by J.K. Rowling) | Cinematographer Eduardo Serra | Starring Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson, Rupert Grint, Ralph Fiennes, Alan Rickman | Length 130 minutes | Seen at Peckhamplex, London, Tuesday 26 July 2011 (and at home on Blu-ray, Tuesday 7 January 2014) || My Rating 3 stars good


© Warner Bros. Pictures

“It all ends.” By this point, the eighth and final film in this massively popular franchise, this was all the posters needed to say — indeed, I scrolled through many pages of images trying to find any with the movie’s title on it. And I suppose you might say, glancing at my slightly lower rating, that I was disappointed by this finale, but in truth it has everything I imagine the audience wants in this kind of thing. I can hardly, in fact, suggest that anything else would have been suitable. It’s just that, having invested so much time over so many films in these characters and the actors who play them, the kind of frenetically-paced action setpieces and big emotion-laden sentimentality that HP7b delivers feels just a mite generic. Still, aside from a humorous possibility held out by the very final scene of a ‘Harry Potter: The Next Generation’, it does at least deliver on the poster’s promise. It all ends.*

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Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 1 (2010)


FILM REVIEW || Director David Yates | Writer Steve Kloves (based on the novel by J.K. Rowling) | Cinematographer Eduardo Serra | Starring Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson, Rupert Grint, Ralph Fiennes, Bill Nighy | Length 153 minutes | Seen at home (Blu-ray), London, Wednesday 1 January 2014 || My Rating 3.5 stars very good


© Warner Bros. Pictures

It seems nowadays like almost a cliché of the tentpole blockbuster adapted from a popular source text, that the final book will be split into more than one film — as if it’s just so sensible a commercial manoeuvre that why would we question it? It happened with The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn (2011/12), and is set to happen with The Hunger Games: Mockingjay (2014/15) — and then there’s The Hobbit (2012/13/14), which has been split into three — so it’s worth recalling that before Deathly Hallows there hadn’t been much of a precedent for this kind of thing (Kill Bill? Though that wasn’t from a novel). Wanting to be faithful to the text and make the inbuilt fans of the franchise happy, and wanting to create a good cohesive piece of narrative cinema, can often pull filmmakers in two directions, so splitting a text can also be a means to ensuring there’s enough time to do justice to the author’s intentions (see also: making a miniseries). And it’s true that previous instalments have had so much plot in them, that just trying to keep up with what’s going on is quite an exercise. So going into the denouement to this wizarding saga, the producers have decided two films are necessary, and who am I to argue?

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