Der Anständige (The Decent One, 2014)

There are certainly plenty of documentaries dealing with World War II, the Nazis, the Holocaust and its legacy, so it’s sometimes unclear what new perspective can be added. The Decent One focuses on Heinrich Himmler, the head of the SS and one of the most senior Nazi figures, the one probably most responsible for the Holocaust, so the title at one level is of course bitterly ironic. And yet the film takes its material from his personal letters and archives found at his home, which indicate he was (at times) a loving and respectful father, even if not the most constant husband. Actors read from these documents in chronological order, with title cards giving some context, while on the image track we see archival footage which illustrates the ideas being discussed, or hint at significant events that were happening at the same time. It’s a straightforward and restrained means to present an insight into what inevitably draws one’s mind to Hannah Arendt’s quote about “the banality of evil”, as tender letters to his wife cede over time to discussions of his role within the Party, or quotidian bitterness towards Jewish members of the community. A sense of the growing unease within the country during the 1930s comes as Himmler responds testily to requests from his father to look into summary arrests of friends and local community members around their home in Gmund. The chief manipulation that the filmmakers seem to have made here is to add sound effects to the documentary footage, which I’m sure opens up all kinds of professional arguments, but does at least make the footage a little more immediate (even if at times it seems in bad taste, as when we see grainy footage of mass executions). It’s never really possible (maybe it’s just not possible at all) to get a sense of the magnitude of what Himmler and the Nazis did, but The Decent One does give a small sense of how apparently easy it was for ideological motivations within everyday life to become dangerously twisted.


© Cinephil

NEW RELEASE FILM REVIEW
Director Vanessa Lapa | Writers Vanessa Lapa and Ori Weisbrod | Cinematographer Jeremy Portnoi | Length 94 minutes || Seen at Ciné Lumière, London, Monday 27 April 2015

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News from Home (1977)

This series is inspired by the Movie Lottery blog, whose author is picking DVD titles from a hat in order to decide which films to watch. As ever, you’ll notice my dust-gathering DVD collection includes a lot more European arthouse films. I’ve selected another one from the hat to watch and present my review below.


FILM REVIEW: Movie Lottery 3 || Director/Writer Chantal Akerman | Cinematographers Babette Mangolte and Jim Asbell | Length 85 minutes | Seen at home (DVD), Tuesday 21 May 2013 || My Rating 4 stars excellent


© Unité Trois

It’s difficult to put into words what’s ultimately affecting about this rather experimental film of the late-1970s, which I can only imagine would be even more affecting to a New Yorker or one who knows the city better. But to me, it’s like an updated city symphony film — those distinctly utopian 1920s visions of the city’s enthralling power — except that, being the 1970s, the city is rather more crumbling. Akerman both captures the spirit of this city, but also subtly imbues it with the darker traces of the intervening decades of the 20th century (and, with its final shot taking in the World Trade Center, also unwittingly wraps in the close of that century). To my mind, it is one of the great films about New York.

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