Non-Stop (2014)


NEW RELEASE FILM REVIEW || Director Jaume Collet-Serra | Writers John W. Richardson, Chris Roach and Ryan Engle | Cinematographer Flavio Martínez Labiano [as Flavio Labiano] | Starring Liam Neeson, Julianne Moore, Michelle Dockery | Length 106 minutes | Seen at Cineworld Shaftesbury Avenue, London, Monday 3 March 2014 || My Rating 2.5 stars likeable


© Universal Pictures

I sometimes wonder what makes a great actor, and what really separates the performances that get recognised in major industry awards and the ones that prop up straightforward genre fare that won’t get anywhere near such recognition. Because this film — a taut action thriller set on a plane for which the threat of global terrorism is just a convenient prop for a bit of gung-ho men-with-guns nonsense — certainly has some good actors in it, ones who’ve had that taste of recognition (Lupita Nyong’o, who has a small role here, just the other night). But none of them are going to be getting any nods next year, except from their accountants, because the difference between those two planes of acting has little to do with the actor, but with the quality of the writing, and this right here is boilerplate generic action-by-numbers. It just so happens that it’s done with enough aplomb that it mostly stays on the right side of enjoyable hokum.

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Captain Phillips (2013)


NEW RELEASE FILM REVIEW || Director Paul Greengrass | Writer Billy Ray (based on the book A Captain’s Duty: Somali Pirates, Navy SEALs, and Dangerous Days at Sea by Richard Phillips and Stephan Talty) | Cinematographer Barry Ackroyd | Starring Tom Hanks, Barkhad Abdi | Length 134 minutes | Seen at Cineworld Wandsworth, London, Tuesday 5 November 2013 || My Rating 4 stars excellent


© Columbia Pictures

When I saw the trailer for this new movie many months ago, I have to say I was afraid it would be a triumphal story of an entitled white man single-handedly defeating the racial Other, though I perhaps didn’t take into account director Paul Greengrass’s involvement. As such, the end result is a movie that doesn’t follow the usual playbooks for this kind of story, and which engages with all its characters in a fair way. Greengrass after all has previous form with films based on real life events that take a sort of documentary aesthetic to their recreations: he gained early acclaim with made-for-TV docudramas before finding a bigger screen with Northern Ireland-set Bloody Sunday (2002) and most notably the gripping and claustrophobic United 93 (2006) about the 9/11 flight (not to mention that his forays into fiction in two Jason Bourne films have managed to retain this patina of realism). Therefore, it should have been no surprise that Captain Phillips is a tense and exciting thriller.

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Alan Partridge: Alpha Papa (2013)


NEW RELEASE FILM REVIEW || Director Declan Lowney | Writers Peter Baynham, Steve Coogan, Neil Gibbons, Rob Gibbons and Armando Iannucci | Cinematographer Ben Smithard | Starring Steve Coogan, Colm Meaney | Length 90 minutes | Seen at Cineworld Shaftesbury Avenue, London, Saturday 10 August 2013 || My Rating 3.5 stars very good


© Studio Canal

Steve Coogan has done a lot of fine acting work, particularly in the films of Michael Winterbottom (A Cock and Bull Story is my own favourite, though earlier this year was the underrated and less overtly comedic The Look of Love), but he remains most famous to British viewers for his character Alan Partridge, who’s had a number of radio and television series not to mention special appearances over the last two decades. The popularity of the character is such, in fact, that it’s prompted this film, though I’m just reciting what I’ve heard because I’d never seen any of these previous appearances (except for his segments on the wonderful The Day Today media satire). Luckily, the film is strong enough to stand on its own without any previous knowledge of his character.

Partridge is by this point a radio broadcaster in his local Norwich, though an erstwhile TV chat show host and before that a sports reporter, known for his terrible fashion sense (knitted sweaters, polo necks and the like), his penchant for bloated MOR rock, his retrogressive political views and most of all, an overweening ego. When the station is taken over and rebranded by a conglomerate named Shape, threatening layoffs, Partridge does all he can to ensure he does not lose his job (or more particularly, his access to whatever small remaining local celebrity he still retains), forcing fellow DJ Pat (played by Colm Meaney) into the firing line. This leads Pat to take the station and its management hostage, and Partridge is the go-between in the ensuing crisis.

There’s some of the same play with a nostalgic past that’s in the other big British comedy of this summer, The World’s End, and though the initial impulse is to laugh at the expense of Alan’s character, in truth there’s a lot of sadness at some of the changes that have occurred, not least those wrought by the rapacious corporate overlords Shape, who have forsaken community values in implementing a bland programming schedule on the radio station. We repeatedly get the sense that the community is behind Pat and Alan rather than the hostages, though that’s only ever around the edges; the filmmakers thankfully aren’t interested in jokes at the expense of the audience (whether the one in the film, or the one watching it).

Beyond this affectionate tribute to the kind of regional and local media that’s so often overlooked, there’s no really big theme to the film, and it’s competently put together. However, it’s consistently funny and sustains the laughs to the end; even the big emotional scenes aren’t played entirely straight, but you get the feeling that beneath the laughs there is a genuine sense of fondness for a disappearing strain of media personality. Steve Coogan may play the character, but the character seems to have his own existence by now.