Singin’ in the Rain (1952)

Films About FilmmakingAmong the more lauded Hollywood films that takes filmmaking as its subject is this classic musical, which casts a wry look back at the transition from silent to sound film. It’s not exactly the most accurate about how a film is made, but it includes some nice period detail nonetheless.


FILM REVIEW: ‘Films about Filmmaking’ Theme || Directors Gene Kelly and Stanley Donen | Writers Betty Comden and Adolph Green | Cinematographer Harold Rosson | Starring Gene Kelly, Debbie Reynolds, Donald O’Connor, Jean Hagen | Length 98 minutes | Seen at home (DVD), London, Saturday 8 February 2014 || My Rating 4.5 stars a must-see


© Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer

I’m sitting here in front of a blank computer screen wondering what there is, usefully, that I can write about this film, which as far as musicals from (and indeed, about) the Golden Age of Hollywood go is surely as classic as they come. If you haven’t already seen it then you’re missing out, and moreover you probably know perfectly well that you’re missing out and intend to rectify that at some point. Which is just as well, because even after all this time it remains a delightful motion picture, thanks in no small part to Gene Kelly’s athletic hoofing (a quaint term for dancing which appropriately puts the focus on footwork), the spry Comden & Green songs, and its self-referential story set in Hollywood’s own (at this point, relatively recent) history.

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