Fast & Furious 6 (2013)

NB The eagle-eyed will note that I’ve decided to add half stars to my ratings scale. I will also be updating some past ratings to take this into account.


NEW RELEASE FILM REVIEW: Fast and Furious Week || Director Justin Lin | Writer Chris Morgan | Cinematographer Stephen F. Windon | Starring Vin Diesel, Paul Walker, Michelle Rodriguez, Dwayne Johnson, Tyrese Gibson, Sung Kang, Jordana Brewster | Length 130 minutes | Seen at Cineworld Shaftesbury Avenue, London, Monday 20 May 2013 || My Rating 3.5 stars very good


© Universal Pictures

Having now seen all five of the previous films in the space of a week, it’s hard to really be objective here. In some ways this sixth film in the series is less tightly structured and less single-minded (less good, in a word) than the one immediately preceding it, Fast Five (2011). And yet it can’t help now but be part of a richly-detailed world for those who’ve followed along, a world with its own skewed logic, its own laws of physics, and its own strangely touching code of honour. The film constantly slows down for moments of familial bonding that are at times brazenly sentimental, it mixes and matches settings, villains and languages in an almost arbitrary way, and it causes all kinds of (mostly bloodless) carnage in its wake, but it’s sort of sweet, and not a little bit thrilling too.

The fifth film set up the return from the dead of Michelle Rodriguez in its epilogue, and her character Letty here becomes the focus for Vin Diesel’s Dominic, her boyfriend and by now the emotional core of the franchise. There is of course a greater villain on the loose (Owen Shaw, played by Luke Evans) who has his own evil team, and they are on the hunt for some kind of superweapon, but though that motivates the reformation of Dom’s team and plenty of the action, it’s the relationship between Dom and Letty (and by extension, the team) that forms the film’s heart. There’s a strong familial ethos (Catholic, one presumes) that binds them, signified by the importance attached to Letty’s necklace with its silver cross, and this is even borne out by a prayer at the film’s close.

Yet the filmmakers are by this point fairly cavalier with most of the comic book circus surrounding this core. Continue reading “Fast & Furious 6 (2013)”

Advertisements

Fast Five (aka Fast & Furious 5, 2011)


FILM REVIEW: Fast and Furious Week || Director Justin Lin | Writer Chris Morgan | Cinematographer Stephen F. Windon | Starring Vin Diesel, Paul Walker, Dwayne Johnson, Jordana Brewster, Tyrese Gibson, Sung Kang | Length 130 minutes | Seen at home (Blu-ray), Sunday 19 May 2013 || My Rating 4 stars excellent


© Universal Pictures

Of the five films in the Fast & Furious franchise so far, the fifth is certainly the best. That’s not to say it isn’t as loud and stupid as many of the others, and there are definitely caveats, but you have to look at films within the genres they inhabit. As a loud and stupid action film, it is triumphant.

There are probably several reasons for this, but for me the most successful aspect of the series is the comradely fellowship that the lead characters by now have with one another. There is more than one scene of various members of Dom (Vin Diesel)’s team hanging out, and though there are disagreements and sometimes fights, they are all ultimately respectful of one another. Probably the nicest example in that regard is when ex-cop Brian (Paul Walker) and his girlfriend, Dom’s sister Mia (Jordana Brewster), share some good news to this extended ‘family’.

Continue reading “Fast Five (aka Fast & Furious 5, 2011)”

Fast & Furious (2009)

I had hoped to have this series wrapped up this week, but I’ll be taking a little break before returning with parts 5 and 6 at the start of next week. In the meantime, I have some new release reviews (of the 12th Star Trek, and Mud) to post tomorrow.


FILM REVIEW: Fast and Furious Week || Director Justin Lin | Writer Chris Morgan | Cinematographer Amir Mokri | Starring Vin Diesel, Paul Walker, Michelle Rodriguez, Jordana Brewster | Length 107 minutes | Seen at home (Blu-ray), Wednesday 15 May 2013 || My Rating 2.5 stars likeable


© Universal Pictures

With the easy familiarity of a family gathering — which as ever includes a few barely-hidden resentments — we get to rejoin the original cast members after the two intervening films, jettisoning only the definite articles in the title. The sole character from the third who returns is Han (Sung Kang), meaning this is technically a prequel, though set five years after the first film. Also returning is Dom’s beloved hotrod (as pictured on the poster) and some of the perfunctory plotting and ridiculous setups (driving drugs through tunnels between the US and Mexico, for example). However, by this point, it all just seems part of the mythology of what is effectively an alternate reality — one in which bad guys need fast drivers — and in the warm glow of the cast reunion I’m fine with that.

Continue reading “Fast & Furious (2009)”

The Fast and the Furious (2001)


FILM REVIEW: Fast and Furious Week || Director Rob Cohen | Writers Gary Scott Thompson, Erik Bergquist and David Ayer (based on the article “Racer X” by Ken Li) | Cinematographer Ericson Core | Starring Vin Diesel, Paul Walker, Michelle Rodriguez, Jordana Brewster | Length 106 minutes | Seen at home (Blu-ray), Saturday 11 May 2013 || My Rating 2.5 stars likeable


© Universal Pictures

When thinking back on the pleasures of this first film in what would become a dependable car-based franchise, it must be said that the plot ranks pretty low. A gang of thieves in impressive racing cars is hijacking trucks laden with valuable electronics, so blond-haired undercover police officer Brian (played by Paul Walker) is sent to infiltrate a notorious group of autoracers headed by Dominic Toretto (played by Vin Diesel) in the hopes of finding out whether he or one of the crews he races against is behind the thefts. That’s pretty much it.

Continue reading “The Fast and the Furious (2001)”