Criterion Sunday 121: Billy Liar (1963)

Someone had clearly been watching those recent French New Wave films and taking cues from Godard and Truffaut. Specifically, director John Schlesinger, one imagines, and he does a British version very well here. Billy Fisher is a chronic dreamer (I can only imagine he was an inspiration for Wes Anderson’s own arch-fantasist Fischer) who just can’t be honest with anyone, least of all himself. It’s the 1960s and the film opens with a montage of modern housing estate developments; Billy lives in a northern city and works at a (literal?) dead-end job, not doing very well there. There’s an energy to Billy, as he bounces around the city from one failure to another, playing off his various fiancées, and enduring his parents’ scorn. There’s also a lovely role for Julie Christie, and while any character who has Julie Christie in love with him and doesn’t immediately ditch everything else to be with her is clearly a moron, Courtenay still manages to work up quite a bit of winsome charm. He’s still an idiot, though and his parents aren’t wrong.


FILM REVIEW: Criterion Collection
Director John Schlesinger | Writers Keith Waterhouse and Willis Hall (based on the novel by Waterhouse) | Cinematographer Denys Coop | Starring Tom Courtenay, Helen Fraser, Julie Christie | Length 98 minutes || Seen at a friend’s home (DVD), London, Sunday 25 September 2016

The Gold Diggers (1983)

I’ve been reading B. Ruby Rich’s memoirs and essay collection from her time in the 1970s and 1980s as a feminist film critic (Chick Flicks) and as she discusses Sally Potter’s breakthrough film work, I thought it timely to watch her first feature, much though I’ve had the DVD on my shelves for the past five years. It wasn’t exactly a success at the time, and looking at it you can understand why: it defiantly avoids anything commercial or saleable. It’s a deeply impenetrable film with a dissociative editing style that seems to hint at many issues and flirt with many different genres, to the extent that it’s generically unclassifiable. Comments on the packaging call it a sci-fi musical, though it doesn’t have any song setpieces and it’s sci-fi to extent of making our world seem alien. You could add in period drama to the mix pretty easily (the Icelandic landscapes and scenes of panning for gold, along with some ballroom costume sequences), but perhaps it could be called a psychodrama of identity, and what it means to be a woman within the recursive forms of filmed illusionism. I mean, perhaps? I don’t even know for sure, but I do know that I’ll need to watch it again to get some sense. In the meantime, for those looking at it but not following along easily (as I was), it’s a gorgeous film to look at, with some of the most spectacular black-and-white images from any film, thanks to its cinematographer (and Chantal Akerman collaborator) Babette Mangolte.


FILM REVIEW
Director Sally Potter | Writers Lindsay Cooper, Rose English and Sally Potter | Cinematographer Babette Mangolte | Starring Julie Christie, Colette Laffont | Length 89 minutes || Seen at home (DVD), London, Wednesday 19 August 2015