Girls Trip (2017)

At some level this is a black women’s twist on a gross-out comedy, which is not traditionally a genre I’ve liked, and yet… It may be too long (at 122 minutes, a good half-hour could easily have been excised), it may be quite mean about celebrity gossip journalists and women posing for selfies on Instagram (I felt like something personal was going on there), it may wrap things up with an excess of saccharine (though admirably focused on women’s friendship with one another rather than on men), but it really is very funny. At times it’s exceptionally funny, especially Tiffany Haddish as Dina, a performer I wasn’t aware of before, but whom I now expect to be in everything, and deservedly so (the scene where she imagines her revenge on a cheating man is satisfying in so many ways). It also features quite the most unexpected male nudity.

It feels like Bridesmaids was in the writers’ minds as a touchstone (not least because they have an actor, Kate Walsh, apparently doing her best to imitate Kristen Wiig), but it also has the brio of Magic Mike XXL in both its setting in the American south (here New Orleans), and its single-minded focus on the buddies-on-a-trip narrative (the presence of Jada Pinkett Smith helps in that regard; she and Queen Latifah also inspire a sweet shout-out to Set It Off, a real 90s classic of the black women buddy genre). Plus, the focus on the women means it dispenses with some of the unpleasantness that marked the women characters in the same director’s The Best Man (1999).

In all, a top comedy, which really deserves its success.


NEW RELEASE FILM REVIEW
Director Malcolm D. Lee | Writers Kenya Barris and Tracy Oliver | Cinematographers Greg Gardiner | Starring Regina Hall, Queen Latifah, Jada Pinkett Smith, Tiffany Haddish | Length 122 minutes || Seen at Odeon Holloway Road, London, Wednesday 2 August 2017

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Bayou Maharajah (2013)

This film seems to have had a long trail from festivals to release, and as there’s a 2016 date at the end of the credits, I assume there’s been some re-editing in the interim. It’s certainly an interesting piece, not least because its subject is himself an interesting character (James Booker, a multi-talented largely-jazz pianist from New Orleans; black, gay, one-eyed) but also one who is relatively obscure: obviously this isn’t more than anecdotal evidence, but I’d never heard of him. That said, the director here makes the choice to present much of his music in full and that’s a strong statement about the quality of his playing, something a lot of music documentaries (even ones about acknowledged ‘geniuses’) don’t do. And yes those performances are worth watching in full.


NEW RELEASE FILM REVIEW
Director Lily Keber | Writers Lily Keber, Aimée Toledano and Tim Watson | Cinematographer David S. White | Length 90 minutes || Seen at Curzon Bloomsbury, London, Monday 18 July 2016

Now You See Me (2013)


ADVANCE SCREENING FILM REVIEW || Director Louis Leterrier | Writers Ed Solomon, Boaz Yakin and Edward Ricourt | Cinematographers Mitchell Amundsen and Larry Fong | Starring Jesse Eisenberg, Mark Ruffalo, Woody Harrelson, Morgan Freeman | Length 115 minutes | Seen at Cineworld Shaftesbury Avenue, London, Monday 17 June 2013 || My Rating 2 stars worth seeing


© Summit Entertainment

Magic and cinema have always seemed to be a good fit, though the kinds of things that will impress a crowd in the live setting are obviously different from those depicted on screen; after all, we flatter ourselves that we understand a little bit of how image makers can manipulate reality. Movie magic depends on a different alchemy, and unfortunately it’s one that the makers of Now You See Me aren’t quite up to providing, though for the most part it’s a jolly ride.

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