The World’s End (2013)


NEW RELEASE FILM REVIEW || Director Edgar Wright | Writers Edgar Wright and Simon Pegg | Cinematographer Bill Pope | Starring Simon Pegg, Nick Frost, Paddy Considine, Martin Freeman, Eddie Marsan | Length 109 minutes | Seen at Cineworld West India Quay, London, Wednesday 24 July 2013 || My Rating 3.5 stars very good


© Universal Pictures

It seems like the 1990s was a fertile time for the emergence of a new generation of British comedy, when there were a number of new star writers and performers coming through on television who in the following decade would go on to make their first films. Among these, comedian Simon Pegg and director Edgar Wright made a strong impression with their Spaced TV series and then the film Shaun of the Dead (2004), a witty parody of the zombie genre transposed to leafy middle-class North London. Like many I’ve been a big fan of their work, particularly the second film Hot Fuzz (2007), which takes a quite different genre (the cop film) and imbues it with a great deal of generosity towards its small town setting and well-meaning central characters.

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Attack the Block (2011)


FILM REVIEW || Director/Writer Joe Cornish | Cinematographer Tom Townend | Starring John Boyega, Jodie Whittaker, Nick Frost | Length 88 minutes | Seen at home (TV), Monday 27 May 2013 || My Rating 3 stars good


© Optimum Releasing

Possibly there are exceptions (I’m no connoisseur), but it seems that whenever aliens visit Earth, they stand in allegorically for some popular fear of the era. 1950s films did well trading on fears of an atomic age, while 1970s films were more concerned with loss of identity. In fact, this trope is well enough understood that in Attack the Block one of the disaffected urban youth at the centre of the film gets a speech acknowledging it. For those familiar with the newspaper headlines in the Britain of the 2010s, you’d expect the threat to allegorically represent the fear of immigrants or indeed of the aforesaid urban youth (“hoodies”, to use a popular term referencing a favoured item of clothing). However, Attack the Block is too metropolitan and knowing to be so simplistic: the hoodies, it turns out, are the heroes and the fear is of the state and its oppressive apparatus (the police… sorry, “the feds”).

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