Miss You Already (2015)

It appears to be the time of year for what are often dismissively termed “chick flicks”. I hate that term, like “women’s pictures” for the melodramas of the 1940s, it smacks of snobbish derision. There are already too many self-satisfied dude auteur films dealing with alienation and violence courting the film school pseuds, not to mention all those deadening superhero epics, so there can never be too many contrasting visions of the world. That all said, I’m not a huge fan exactly, though as far as a melodramatic ‘weepie’ goes, Miss You Already does fine. Drew Barrymore remains a potently charismatic and cheerful presence on any cinema screen even as she reaches her (shock!) 40s, but this film is all about Toni Collette’s English rock-n-roll chick (her accent doesn’t grate, thankfully), with whom Drew’s character grew up, as she acts out, gets into trouble, then has a family (apparently adjusting with ease) and, as we catch up with her, is now coping with a cancer diagnosis. Being set in London, everyone has those kind of perfect London homes that surely don’t really exist (Barrymore and boyfriend played by Paddy Considine live together on a boat overlooking Battersea Power Station!), and meaningful moments take place in picturesque locations — though at least the geography isn’t strained too far beyond credulity. More to the point, Collette gets through the tearful and angry scenes with her dignity intact, which is more than can always be said for whomever scored the film, though leaning on late-80s alt-indie classics is I suppose in keeping with the characters. It’s certainly not a bad film, and it’s even heartwarming in its way.

Miss You Already film poster CREDITS
Director Catherine Hardwicke; Writer Morwenna Banks; Cinematographer Elliot Davis; Starring Toni Collette, Drew Barrymore, Paddy Considine, Dominic Cooper, Jacqueline Bisset; Length 94 minutes.
Seen at Cineworld Wandsworth, London, Sunday 27 September 2015.

Pride (2014)

It’s easy to be dismissive of a certain strand of emotionally-manipulative feel-good films about small communities resisting state oppression, or maybe it’s just easy for me. I can be cynical. Pride recalls similar British films of the recent past, set in the same milieu (miners fighting for their lives and livelihood against the policies of Margaret Thatcher’s Conservative party), like Brassed Off (1996) and to a certain extent The Full Monty (1998). Still, it does the whole thing every bit as well as those films did, and further frames it within the (largely metropolitan) struggles for gay rights during the same era, a struggle marked in some measure by the scourge of AIDS and the Thatcher government’s almost dismissive response to it. (I was but a young lad in the 1980s, but I still remember the bleak finality of their TV ads about AIDS.) You could argue there’s a bit of rose tinting involved in taking two narratives permeated with real pain, death and indignity, and crafting something heartwarming and feel-good out of it. Sure, there’s a nod at the beginning to the unlikeliness of the (drawn from real-life) conjunction of two struggles in the form of Mark Ashton’s Lesbians and Gays Support the Miners (LGSM) activist group, who collect money to help the embattled mining community. When they have their first meeting in London’s Gay’s the Word bookshop (still there, pleasingly), one man angrily denounces the way he’d been beaten up by miners when he was younger, stalking out of the shop and taking most of the rest with him. However, such unease is quickly smoothed over as Ashton (played likeably by Ben Schnetzer) finds a Welsh mining community who are willing to accept donations from the LGSM, and there follows a wary yet rather delightful rapprochement between the two very different camps, ably helped by wiser heads amongst the Welsh (including the very much not-Welsh actors Paddy Considine, Imelda Staunton and Bill Nighy). And yet, whatever reservations one may have about the way things unfold, it has an irresistible charm, by turns funny, sweet and heartbreakingly poignant. It’s also an unapologetic flag-waver for the union movement, bookending the film with rousing pro-union anthems. Most surprisingly, the events of the film are all drawn from real life, so the film’s title is quite apt: it makes one proud, and not a little bit teary.

Pride film posterCREDITS
Director Matthew Warchus; Writer Stephen Beresford; Cinematographer Tat Radcliffe; Starring Ben Schnetzer, George MacKay, Bill Nighy, Imelda Staunton, Paddy Considine; Length 125 minutes.
Seen at Rio, London, Friday 12 September 2014.

The World’s End (2013)

It seems like the 1990s was a fertile time for the emergence of a new generation of British comedy, when there were a number of new star writers and performers coming through on television who in the following decade would go on to make their first films. Among these, comedian Simon Pegg and director Edgar Wright made a strong impression with their Spaced TV series and then the film Shaun of the Dead (2004), a witty parody of the zombie genre transposed to leafy middle-class North London. Like many I’ve been a big fan of their work, particularly the second film Hot Fuzz (2007), which takes a quite different genre (the cop film) and imbues it with a great deal of generosity towards its small town setting and well-meaning central characters.

So there has been a great deal of anticipation, not least by myself, for the third in this self-proclaimed ‘Cornetto’ trilogy of small town films (and yes I know the first is set in London, but it’s a peculiarly leafy suburban vision, focused on one of the many villages that make up the capital). And like the recent This Is the End it comedically references the apocalypse — which should be no surprise to those who’ve seen the poster or the trailer. The tone here is more wistful, though both films deal with characters who are cut off from reality — the one narcissistic actors, the other a man overly attached to a nostalgic vision of his past.

In truth, there’s a great deal of pathos in Simon Pegg’s Gary King. He’s a middle-aged man who’s never really grown out of his late-teenage years, still clinging to the same counter-cultural fashion statements and love of early-90s pop culture: his clichés are as likely to be quotes from Primal Scream’s “Loaded” (a totemic song which appears in both the trailer and the film) as anything else. In fact, the first act of the film does a really nice job of sketching out this character, as he tries to get his old clique of friends back together for a return to their home town. He wants them to complete the ‘Golden Mile’, a pub crawl taking in the 12 village pubs, which they tried once when they were 18 but never completed, and his insistence on this peculiarly teenage veneration of the power of alcoholic excess as a means of social bonding seems by this point strangely misplaced. All his friends are, after all, now well-adjusted and successful members of society (a banker, an estate agent, an architect, and a car salesman).

The film also does a great job at linking this to observations about the homogenisation of the English high street, particularly in the identikit chain pubs that inhabit such towns: the first two that the gang return to look exactly the same in every detail. It’s not just the pubs either that are the same, but many of those drinking in them and serving behind the bars have not changed; it’s the kind of stasis that infected the town of Hot Fuzz, and in both cases (though in different ways) the inhabitants seem to have succumbed to a very literal possession. This, after all, is the grand allegory that the ‘body snatchers’ theme is tied into.

However, it’s that very overdetermination in the last third of the film that ends up making me feel a little cold towards it. It’s not that I don’t like or appreciate the genre trappings, it’s just that they’re too obvious, and (for me, at least) somewhat undercut the foregoing scenes that have gently built up the characters through acutely-detailed observational humour. Moreover, the focus on Pegg’s Gary and Nick Frost’s Andrew, a banker who has unresolved issues with Gary stemming from a mysterious incident earlier in their lives, means that the other three fine actors who are part of the ensemble (Paddy Considine, Eddie Marsan and Martin Freeman) seem rather underutilised.

Anyway, I feel like I’m being too harsh on what is, still, after all, one of the better British comedies of recent memory. It definitely hits the laugh quotient, and makes lots of salient points. Maybe I just find the overweening nostalgia the film shows for a time which was also during my own teenage years a little bit too close to the bone, or maybe I still retain an optimism that there’s a way out that needn’t involve the end of the world.

The World's End film posterCREDITS
Director Edgar Wright; Writers Wright and Simon Pegg; Cinematographer Bill Pope; Starring Simon Pegg, Nick Frost, Paddy Considine, Martin Freeman, Eddie Marsan; Length 109 minutes.
Seen at Cineworld West India Quay, London, Wednesday 24 July 2013.