Hummingbird (aka Redemption, 2013)

FILM REVIEW || Seen at home (Blu-ray), London, Wednesday 2 July 2014 || My Rating 2.5 stars likeable


© Lionsgate

I think it’s fair to say that Jason Statham has carved himself out a fruitful corner of the action film genre and his oeuvre already incorporates a number of familiar elements. It was said upon Hummingbird‘s release that it marked something of a departure, a more serious actorly turn for this most unchallenging of screen presences. Indeed, there is a bit of subtlety to his backstory as a former soldier in Afghanistan who is scarred by some enigmatic (and ultimately, never fully satisfying) event in his past. Yet, there’s also plenty to link it to Statham’s already burgeoning filmography. There are the revenge plot elements (he has the most perfunctorily set-up relationship with a young woman at the start and we have to endure that peculiarly reprehensible trope of character-building: a woman dying to further a male lead’s emotional depth) and there’s even a young daughter (it’s always a young daughter or daughter-surrogate in his films) with whose mother he clearly has a very strained relationship. However, I don’t mean to denigrate the film’s evident strengths, which are mostly expressed through the central relationship between Statham’s character Joey — initially seen as a homeless outdoor sleeper in London’s Soho — and a Polish nun, Sister Cristina, who works at a Covent Garden soup kitchen. It strains credulity at times (though not as much as the plot contrivance which sees Joey gain unrestricted access to a swanky Covent Garden loft apartment for nine months), but the relationship between this unlikely couple is even touching at times. Statham continues to make enjoyably silly action films, but there’s hope yet for some extension to his actorly range.


CREDITS || Director/Writer Steven Knight | Cinematographer Chris Menges | Starring Jason Statham, Agata Buzek | Length 100 minutes

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