Criterion Sunday 268: 野獣の青春 Yaju no Seishun (Youth of the Beast, 1963)

I can’t honestly tell you I understood every twist and turn in this film about a man seeking revenge for the death of his friend. It starts out in black-and-white as we happen upon an apparent double-suicide of a cop and his girlfriend, though even here there is a splash of colour in some roses, before we barrel straight into the rest of the movie, in sharp poppy colours in a widescreen format. In truth it’s the visuals that really stand out here, and director Suzuki has an eye for framing in what is very much a stylish picture. As for the plot, our anti-hero Jo (played by the easily-recognisable Joe Shishido) swings through various setups involving gangsters and hangers-on, pretty liberally wielding his fists, guns and even a spraycan he’s adapted into a flamethrower to elicit the information he wants about who was responsible for what in those opening scenes he clearly thinks was a murder. It zips along at a good pace but it always retains its pop-art appeal.


FILM REVIEW: Criterion Collection
Director Seijun Suzuki 鈴木清順; Writers Ichiro Ikeda 池田一朗 and Tadaaki Yamazaki 山崎忠昭 (based on the novel 人狩り by Haruhiko Oyabu 大藪春彦); Cinematographer Kazue Nagatsuka 永塚一栄; Starring Joe Shishido 宍戸錠, Misako Watanabe 渡辺美佐子; Length 92 minutes.

Seen at a friend’s home (DVD), London, Friday 20 September 2019.

Criterion Sunday 9: 辣手神探 Lashou Shentan (Hard Boiled, 1992)

When I was younger, I seem to recall liking this film best of John Woo’s output (that I’d seen), but those were long-ago days, and frankly it’s quite likely that more than one viewing just leads to exhaustion — if anything, it’s the defining feature of Woo’s agressive style. Woo uses a lot of his fondest techniques, including the one so heavily-used in The Killer of two dudes pulling guns on each other while the camera circles around and they cagily exchange words, but mostly there’s just a whole lot of explosions, ensuring that Hong Kong’s film pyrotechnists are kept in work. Basically, the two guys are both cops, though Chow Yun-fat is the detective, and Tony Leung the one working undercover in a criminal gang. Stuff happens, there’s a generous dollop of sentimentality, and of course, there are lots and lots of stylishly violent gun battles.

Criterion Extras: For the most part, due to necessary lack of funds, most of the films have been seen in non-Criterion editions, but I managed to source a copy of this rather vintage out-of-print DVD, which has a collection of intriguing extras. There’s a commentary, as well as an early student film, a strange little soundless black-and-white Super 8 oddity called Accidentally (1968) which features a story of a boy and a girl and some rope, all very rough and unflashily done, though with a few interesting shots. More substantial is a collection of 11 trailers covering Woo’s Hong Kong career from a bunch of early kung fu films in the 1970s as well as some odder projects like a Cantonese opera adaptation and what looks like a fairly broad capitalist satire, through to his gangster-and-guns films of the 1980s. Because the trailers use large chunks of Woo’s filmmaking and run to three or four minutes in length, there’s a good sense of his developing style, and brief text introductions contextualise the films. There are also some essays, but presenting written contributions on DVD screens seems like a fad which has had its day, and more recent Criterion editions prefer a chunky booklet.


FILM REVIEW: Criterion Collection
Director John Woo 吳宇森; Writer Barry Wong 黃炳耀; Cinematographer Wong Wing-hang 黃永恆; Starring Chow Yun-fat 周潤發, Tony Leung 梁朝偉; Length 128 minutes.

Seen at home (VHS), Wellington, December 1997 (and most recently on DVD at a friend’s home, London, Sunday 16 November 2014).

The East (2013)

It’s always a precarious thing, trying to capture in a fiction film a flavour of contemporary counterculture. You only have to look back to attempts to depict the earnest ferment of young minds in the 1970s to see how laughable the outcome can seem in hindsight. Of course that’s not entirely fair: it’s not all to do with the filmmakers or the period fashions. In part, it’s to do with the way that earnestness (much like faith) comes across on film: in the darkness of the auditorium, passively taking in images, it’s difficult not to be a jaded, judgemental cynic. This is never more so than when faced with the passionate belief of characters who are trying to actively engage with a corrupt system. There are times when the protagonists of The East, young ecological activists (anarchists, perhaps, or “terrorists” to the authorities), come across as a bit ridiculous, but they’re certainly not fools.

Fiction film has never seemed a particularly effective medium for protest, and I can’t imagine it ever being so. There have always been attempts to create films that challenge the viewer and move the argument beyond the auditorium, whether the bold agitprop of Soviet filmmakers in the 1920s, or Latin American filmmakers like Fernando Solanas with La hora de los hornos (The Hour of the Furnaces, 1968), who actually programmed in discussion breaks to screenings. Fiction’s strength is in being able to give a bit of insight as to how activists operate and why they do what they do, and perhaps thereby create doubt in the viewer’s mind as to the veracity of society’s orthodoxies. As such the protagonist here is Jane, a corporate spy played by co-writer Brit Marling, who infiltrates the group as an undercover agent called Sarah, and comes to harbour doubts about what she’s doing.

Aside from being the title of the film, The East is the name the activists give to their group, which engages in ‘jams’ — which is to say, interventions against corporations they perceive have wronged people or the environment. The film opens with video footage they’ve uploaded to the internet showing them pumping oil into the home of a CEO whose company is responsible for massive oil spills. However, as the company is a client of Jane/Sarah’s firm, she is assigned to get information on them that they can then pass to the FBI. As the company’s boss Sharon, Patricia Clarkson does an excellent job as confidant (and arch-manipulator) of the younger Jane.

It’s clear that the activists are all well-educated middle-class kids, many having coming from the same enshrined power base as the capitalist moguls they are targeting. Their choice in resisting and fighting against these power structures is shown to be a result of their education and world travel. As a result, on several occasions in the film their resistance group seems closer to a cult: they have a leader figure filled with a sort of evangelical zeal (Alexander Skarsgård’s Benji), not to mention rituals of initiation and group bonding that reaffirm their communal social structure and attachment to the environment. It’s Jane/Sarah’s experience that mediates this for the audience, and the precarious line the film must walk is in moving from our initial shared experience of their group as being rather affectedly ridiculous, to one in which Sarah (and hopefully the audience too) feels more sympathy and engagement with their beliefs.

The East is in the end a gripping film that never mocks or condescends to its earnest protagonists, as they engage with real issues affecting the world. Playing the wary central character, who limns the divide between the forces of authority and anarchy, Brit Marling does a wonderful job, yet I’m not sure that either she or the film manages to quite carry me through as an audience member to the denouement. In the darkness of a cinema, I remain a cynic to the end, but then I equally can’t imagine the film’s activists being much enamoured of cinema and its passive spectatorship. Still, it’s a bold attempt to try to be more than just a petit bourgeois escapist pleasure, while being satisfying on just that level.

The East film posterCREDITS
Director Zal Batmanglij; Writers Zal Batmanglij and Brit Marling; Cinematographer Roman Vasyanov Роман Васьянов; Starring Brit Marling, Alexander Skarsgård, Ellen Page, Patricia Clarkson; Length 116 minutes.
Seen at Cineworld Haymarket, London, Sunday 30 June 2013.