March 2018 Film Roundup

Three months have passed in my 2018 challenge to watch an unseen film (something new or new to you) every day, with the bonus proviso that it’s ‘March Around the World’ month (a Letterboxd-based film-viewing challenge) so there’s an international flavour to my watching (more than usual), with a specific reference to Africa. Expect African films! Again, I’m still posting notes on all of them over at Letterboxd, but a round-up is required.

Top 5 New Films (on their first release in the UK)

Sweet Country (2017, dir. Warwick Thornton)
Annihilation
(2018, dir. Alex Garland)
Malila: The Farewell Flower
(2017, dir. Anucha Boonyawatana)
Untitled
(2017, dir. Michael Glawogger/Monika Willi)
Close-Knit
(2017, dir. Naoko Ogigami)

Only one of these films was actually given a release at cinemas (the first one), although I should note that I also caught up with Lynne Ramsay’s You Were Never Really Here for a second time (I originally saw it at last year’s London Film Festival), and it’s surely my favourite film that was given a cinema release in March, a bleak anti-genre film pulling apart the mythology of the lone hitman.

There are two films from streaming services, with the poetic documentary about nothing in particular, Untitled (the last film by documentarian Michael Glawogger) on Mubi, while Annihilation was of course only given a Netflix release in the UK (aside from a few measly one-off screenings at Everyman cinemas).

My final two films above, Malila and Close-Knit, were screened at the BFI Flare film festival (which deals with LGBTQI+ themes), though I daresay they won’t get a ‘proper’ release. The first is by a trans woman filmmaker although it doesn’t explicitly deal with transgender people (it’s sort of a gay love story set in the Thai jungles, but more than that it’s a Buddhist-inflected meditation on what it means to be alive), while the Japanese film is a more commercially-orientated film about a family unit featuring a trans woman (played by a cis male, as it’s early days for Japan I suppose).

Top 10 Old Films (but new to me)

Untitled (For Marilyn) (1992) and Lovesong (2001, dir. Stan Brakhage)
Daratt (aka Dry Season) (2006, dir. Mahamat-Saleh Haroun)
Happy Hour (2015, dir. Ryusuke Hamaguchi)
Umberto D. (1952, dir. Vittoria de Sica)
Faat Kiné (2001, dir. Ousmane Sembène)
The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog (1927, dir. Alfred Hitchcock)
Samba Traoré (1992, dir. Idrissa Ouédraogo)
Yeelen (1987, dir. Souleymane Cissé)
XXY (2007, dir. Lucía Puenzo)
Melancholia (2008, dir. Lav Diaz)

The Criterion Sunday project of watching Criterion Collection films provides my joint number 1, two short films by Stan Brakhage, which is a bit of a cheat I suppose but as they’re both under 10 minutes, it seems fair. Brakhage has a number of these painted-directly-on-the-celluloid works, and Untitled is perhaps my favourite, dedicated to his wife. Almost every image is like an individual painting, overwhelming in its cumulative beauty, though you do need to put on a good soundtrack (they’re both silent). Criterion is also responsible for Umberto D., a sensitive and nuanced De Sica film, very beautiful and very sad. The Lodger was also projected off a Criterion disc, but this wasn’t part of my project (not yet), as the night I saw it was more dedicated to the musical trio providing accompaniment (hence the rather patchy film projection).

There’s a number of African films, as trailed in my intro above, because of the ‘March Around the World’ focus on African cinema this year. My favourite was the Chadian film Daratt, which has a beautiful simplicity to it. Indeed, unclutted narratives are a bit of a feature of my favourite films, including Samba Traoré (Burkina Faso), Yeelen (Mali) and Faat Kiné (Senegal).

At the rather more epic end of the scale are the 5½ hour Happy Hour (a recent Japanese film about four women) and the 7½ hour Melancholia (another of Lav Diaz’s customary overlong meditations on Filipino history and society). Finally, bringing things back to the LGBTQI themes mentioned above was XXY, a beautiful Argentine film about a gender non-conforming person.

 

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February 2018 Film Roundup

So I’m back again this month with the second episode of my 2018 challenge to watch an unseen film (something new or new to you) every day. February is a shorter month but I still packed plenty in (including two visits to see Lady Bird at the cinema). Plus, as anyone in Europe knows, it’s been getting quite cold the last few days, so sitting inside watching films seems like a particularly fine pastime; when it gets to the summer months, I feel my challenge will be more stretched. Anyway, I’m still posting notes on all of them over at Letterboxd, but a round-up is required.

Top 5 New Films (on their first release in the UK)

The Nothing Factory (2017, dir. Pedro Pinho)
Phantom Thread (2017, dir. Paul Thomas Anderson)
Princess Cyd (2017, dir. Stephen Cone)
Black Panther (2018, dir. Ryan Coogler)
Lady Bird (2017, dir. Greta Gerwig)

Continuing last month’s theme of poetic documentaries screened at the ICA (Institute of Contemporary Arts), my favourite film of the month was another slightly leftfield experimental work released by them, a three-hour-long Portuguese documentary-like fiction feature set amongst the workers at a factory, who’ve been laid off and want to wrest back control. It’s thoughtful and artful, covering a range of genres and formal discourse while reflecting carefully on the state of the worker under capitalism: it can be boring at times, but it’s also compelling and beautiful.

Netflix was also responsible, finally, for releasing a good film in the form of Princess Cyd, which had a screening last year at London Film Festival, but slipped under the radar and got the modern equivalent of the straight-to-DVD. Well, it’s exquisitely made, and deals beautifully with its middle-class characters. (Although I’m being a bit mean about Netflix, since they also had a film on my last listMy Happy Family, another fine drama.)

There were also several ‘big’ releases that stood out too. As I mentioned, I went to Lady Bird twice, probably because that was the most straightforwardly enjoyable: small town, closely-studied characters, the beauty of which is in their interactions (so, not entirely unlike Princess Cyd). However, I loved P.T. Anderson’s newest film, finding it less about an awful man, as about the subtle warping of traditional power dynamics of the controlling mercurial artist (a great performance from Vicky Krieps). And of course Black Panther was a phenomenon which I was happy to get on board with, world creation in a way that seemed fresh and new after all the tiresome bombast of some previous superhero films (although still with, well, plenty of bombast).

Top 10 Old Films (but new to me)

Il posto (1961, dir. Ermanno Olmi)
The Act of Seeing with One’s Own Eyes (1971, dir. Stan Brakhage)
Thelma (2017, dir. Joachim Trier)
Boy (2010, dir. Taika Waititi)
I fidanzati (1963, dir. Ermanno Olmi)
The Blood of Jesus (1941, dir. Spencer Williams)
Initiation Love (2015, dir. Yukihiko Tsutsumi)
Dirty Gertie from Harlem U.S.A. (1946, dir. Spencer Williams)
Black Panthers (1968, dir. Agnès Varda)
Bad Moms (2016, dir. Scott Moore/Jon Lucas)

Streaming services again offered up a few interesting recent films I’d somehow missed, and while only Thelma makes it onto this list (via Mubi), it stands up to the other Joachim Trier film they screened last month (his 2006 Reprise) — this one may indeed be better, but it’s mysterious enough that I think I need to let it sit with me a while. Still, it has a fantastic control of atmosphere.

Continued Criterion watching threw up the wonderful Ermanno Olmi films listed there, as well as the challenging Brakhage, all of which I will give fuller write-ups in time, when their entries show up on my Criterion Sunday feature.

The two Spencer Williams movies were from the Pioneers of African-American Cinema box set that I helped to Kickstart, and because it’s Black History Month, it seemed like a good idea to crack on through (I also watched some slightly sub-par Oscar Micheaux features from the early sound era). The Williams ones, though, are fascinating in the way they are pulled between overt moralising and also the thrill of sinfulness: the acting can be amateurish, but the period detail is wonderful. Black Panthers, too (a short Varda documentary from the late-60s), seemed a propos not just in relation to black history but also the feature film of (almost) the same name — well, it at least contextualised Oakland, CA’s symbolic importance through its footage of the activist group.

There was a short season of Japanese cinema at the ICA by the Japan Foundation which threw up a few intriguing films, best of all for me being Initiation Love, which I believe was a made-for-TV movie but with a bold time-looping premise and a big twist that makes it all retrospectively even more interesting (although the film is enjoyable enough as a relationship drama). Plus, I finally got around to watching Taika Waititi’s early feature Boy, which is as charming and delightful as most of his work has been, and almost entirely set amongst a poor, working, rural Maori community in New Zealand. Incredibly, it’s only just had a DVD release in this country.

January 2018 Film Roundup

I rarely post here nowadays except for the weekly Criterion Sunday films (some day, some day, I’ll get round to posting more once again)… But I’ve still been watching films! My friend Pete has been doing a 2018 challenge to watch an unseen film (something new or new to you) every day, so that’s quite a few films. I’m posting notes on them over at Letterboxd, but hey why not have a round-up here!

Top 5 New Films (on their first release in the UK)

Self-Criticism of a Bourgeois Dog (2017, dir. Julian Radlmeier)
Tempestad (2016, dir. Tatiana Huezo)
Field N—-s (2015, dir. Khalik Attah)
The Post (2017, dir. Steven Spielberg)
Journey’s End (2017, dir. Saul Dibb)

Signing up to the Mubi streaming service has introduced me to a wide range of new films, including some new releases that never came out in the cinema. The films of Julian Radlmeier are notable amongst these, and while his first two shorter works were interesting, it’s his first full-length feature which had me hooked on his particularly deadpan satirical style (a little bit reminiscent of Jessica Hausner’s Amour Fou, by way of Jarmusch).

Then again, a couple of these favourites are poetic and somewhat experimental documentaries screened at the Institute of Contemporary Arts (the two pre-2017 films above), so perhaps my tastes are taking me a little way from the multiplex these days. Rey (2017, dir. Niles Atallah), which I caught in the cinema but was also on Mubi during January, was another rather interesting film, a staged fiction but which intersected with documentary in surprising ways.

Of the big releases I saw, The Post was probably my favourite, but I found plenty to like in Journey’s End (a rendering of WWI via a stage play), and — just missing out on my top 5 — The Commuter (2018, dir. Jaume Collet-Serra), wherein Liam Neeson punches people on a train, albeit in an efficient and entertaining way.

Top 10 Old Films (but new to me)

Street Without End (1934, dir. Mikio Naruse)
Snow Canon (2011, dir. Mani Diop)
My Happy Family (2017, dir. Nana Ekvtimishvili/Simon Groß)
Reprise (2006, dir. Joachim Trier)
Reminiscences of a Journey to Lithuania (1972, dir. Jonas Mekas)
Mur Murs (1981, dir. Agnes Varda)
The Hitch-Hiker (1953, dir. Ida Lupino)
Dead Slow Ahead (2015, dir. Mauro Herce)
Funeral Parade of Roses (1969, dir. Toshio Matsumoto)
Jubilee (1978, dir. Derek Jarman)

My old film watching takes in one film first released on Netflix last December, which for my purposes counts as ‘old’ but isn’t really (My Happy Family, a wonderful Georgian film). Elsewhere, a screening of Mati Diop’s early short and medium-length works opened my eyes to a bright new talent I’d been missing this decade, and makes me excited for her upcoming feature-length debut.

As for older works, I’ve been trying to catch up on the classics of Japanese cinema, which brought me to Mikio Naruse’s silent works (most of which I watched towards the tail end of last year) and also Funeral Parade of Roses, a sort of unclassifiable piece of drama which seems to throw everything into the mix.

Several of the rest of my list above screened on Mubi, so they’re a blend of films I’ve long meant to get round to watching (Varda and Mekas) peppered with others by directors largely unknown to me, but whose films I was surprised by (Trier and Herce). I know Joachim Trier in particular has a profile, but like Diop, I’ve somehow missed his films. I shall have to do some catching up.