Two Short Reviews of Recent Films Set in the 19th Century

Two more short reviews of films I just haven’t been able to summon up the enthusiasm to think about at great length. Not that either of them is bad, mind.


© Entertainment One

Mr. Turner (2014) || Seen at Cineworld Haymarket, London, Tuesday 4 November 2014 || Director/Writer Mike Leigh | Cinematographer Dick Pope | Starring Timothy Spall, Marion Bailey, Dorothy Atkinson | Length 149 minutes || My Rating 3.5 stars very good

This latest by Mike Leigh seems to have divided audiences and critics, though by most metrics it has done very well at the box office, a fine feat considering its length. Presumably it appeals to the heritage crowd, what with being a period film, and at that it does very well, conjuring a good sense of 19th century London, with its galleries and its fine houses, as well as its muck and dirt, not to mention the failings of medicine (Dorothy Atkinson’s servant gets progressively more blighted by psoriasis as the film goes on). At the film’s heart is Timothy Spall’s JMW Turner, a painter of some of the finest works of English art, who here is a gruffly monosyllabic grouch who communicates more in coughs and splutters than with words (Spall’s performance is in fact second only this year to Gérard Depardieu’s in Welcome to New York for guttural grunting). Yet it’s an oddly disjointed film, which moves along in vignettes — Turner at the Royal Academy disputing with his fellow painters, Turner at home, Turner on holiday in Margate, this kind of thing. To be fair, this gives it the sense of a series of (moving) paintings, much like Turner’s work, and like his work a lot of the film is very beautifully shot. However, even the most artfully composed film could never approach the breathtaking vistas of Turner’s later paintings, so perhaps my point of comparison is just unfair in the first place.


© Roadside Attractions

The Homesman (2014) || Seen at Cineworld West India Quay, London, Tuesday 25 November 2014 || Director Tommy Lee Jones | Writers Tommy Lee Jones, Kieran Fitzgerald and Wesley Oliver (based on the novel by Glendon Swarthout) | Cinematographer Rodrigo Prieto | Starring Hilary Swank, Tommy Lee Jones | Length 122 minutes || My Rating 3 stars good

Another film set in the 19th century — in fact, covering many of the same years as Mr. Turner, albeit on another side of the Atlantic — is this film by actor turned writer/director Tommy Lee Jones. His debut film as director was the wonderful and underrated The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada (2005), a film with a great feeling for border territories, and this new film is again set on a frontier of sorts. I’m tempted to call it a Western, though it’s not set in the west but rather in Nebraska, and it deals with a sturdy frontierswoman, Mary Bee Cuddy (played capably by Hilary Swank), who for various reasons has to accompany three mad women back to civilisation, where they can be (more) properly cared for. She soon picks up Tommy Lee’s disreputable George Briggs to help her, and thus begins their journey. It’s all very ably and attractively shot by veteran DoP Rodrigo Prieto, and in the two central roles Jones and Swank make for a fine odd couple. But things take a turn later on which is both unexpected and abrupt, though undoubtedly it suggests (and, more widely, the film does capture well) a sense of the difficulties attendant on life in this era and location. In which respect, of course, the roles for the mad women are rather thankless, amounting to little more than gurning and groaning at times. Yet, while it’s a film that feels as if it has two distinct parts, it certainly also has its virtues.

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One thought on “Two Short Reviews of Recent Films Set in the 19th Century

  1. Still have yet to see Mr. Turner (although I can’t wait), but I have seen the Homesman and it was okay, to say the least. Mostly though, because Jones put a nice little spin on the Western genre that I wasn’t expecting. Good review Ewan.

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